What’s on my 2018 Summer Reading List?

My 2018 Summer Reading List

Growing up, I was that kid with 30 books shoved haphazardly into her backpack for family vacation. Reading is something that I absolutely loved. I still do.

I average about 4-5 books per month, depending on workload and how much I’m sitting in a car. 

Here’s what’s on my summer reading list!

So You Want to Talk About Race by Ijeoma Oluo

2018 Summer Reading List

Ijeoma Oluo does a brilliant job of breaking down white privilege, police brutality, microaggressions, and more into digestible, bite-sized chunks. If you’ve ever wondered how to tackle tough issues regarding race in America or wondered about your own privilege, this is a great stepping stone.

All the Women in my Family Sing edited by Deborah Santana

2018 Summer Reading List

This is an anthology of prose written entirely about women of color. It illuminates just how diverse and complex women across the world are, and showcases our resilience. Bonus points for me because most of the writers are in the Bay Area! This is currently the reading material for Bay Area Outdoor Women Peninsula Book Club, too!

Braving the Wilderness by Brené Brown

2018 Summer Reading List

I was introduced to Brené Brown by a good friend of mine. Braving the Wilderness redefines what it means to truly belong, and having the courage to stick to your guns, even if you’re doing it alone. 

Unbound by Steph Jagger

2018 Summer Reading List

I haven’t read Unbound yet, but I am looking forward to it! I was lucky enough to spend a small chunk of time with Steph last year. She brightens up any room she’s in. Unbound is Steph’s journey about skiing 4 million vertical feet in a year, and more.

Crazy Rich Asians by Kevin Kwan

2018 Summer Reading List

I had to sneak this one in here because the movie comes out next month! On August 15th! This story follows an Asian woman who gets thrown into her boyfriend’s filthy rich world. It’s ridiculous and over the top, but the underlying messages of family first and achieving utter perfection are still completely relatable. Plus it’s a book where Asian people aren’t ninjas or nerds!

What’s on your summer reading list?