Tag: the north face

Do Something: An Open Letter to Outdoor Brands

Via ferrata in Telluride, CO by Marisa Jarae, the diversity dilemma in outdoor media

Photo by Marisa Jarae.

Original piece: “Why Don’t They Look Like Me? The Diversity Dilemma in Outdoor Media”

Dear Outdoor Brands,

Are you offended? Are you angry? Do you think you were unfairly called out or linked to? I’m glad I struck a note. You should do something about it, if you think I’m in the wrong. But by do something about it, I don’t mean aggressively emailing me to take my links down because it’s driving negative traffic to your site.

Instead of telling me that you’re a diverse, minority-owned company, and we’re fighting the same fight, and that I’m wrong, you should prove me wrong. I posted an opinion piece. In my opinion, what you’re presenting doesn’t seem that diverse. Is it my place to tell people whether or not something is diverse? Of course not, I am not the diversity police. I linked to you because I wanted people to be able to form their own opinion. So prove me wrong. Prove the traffic wrong. Give those link clickers a reason to say “Hey Company, what is wrong with this blogger? She’s clearly wrong.” Give me a reason to say I’m wrong.

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REI Intro to Mountaineering Course

Mountaineering is one of those things that I’ve been trying to get into for a while now. I mean, who can resist gr1m, frostbitten, kvlt ice and spikey things and tall peaks?

For the boyfriend’s Christmas present, I got him an intro to mountaineering class for the two of us through REI’s Outdoor School.

REI Intro to Mountaineering Review REI Intro to Mountaineering Review REI Intro to Mountaineering Review REI Intro to Mountaineering Review REI Intro to Mountaineering Review REI Intro to Mountaineering Review

We woke up well before the sun was up and drove to the REI in Roseville. The other option was to meet at the Donner Pass Sno Park next to Boreal. We arrived at the trailhead at around 10AM due to a freak bus fire accident on the side of 80.

Our instructors, Dakota and Ryan, handed out ice axes, crampons, helmets and gaiters. Students were free to bring their own gear if they had it. Then, we set off across the road towards Castle Peak. It had snowed a bunch the week before, and without snowshoes, we were mostly postholing in the snow.

Did a lot of practice of walking in balance up and down hills. Spent some time practicing kick stepping and the French technique. We spent an absurd amount of time practicing self-arresting in various ways. Did some self belaying up and down the side of a powdery hill. Practiced some “real” mixed climbing up a rock formation.

And then glissaded all the way back down (mostly) to the trailhead, which was awesome. I want to glissade my life away.

If you’re looking for a glimpse into mountaineering, I highly recommend this class, though your mileage may vary. Dakota and Ryan were super, nice, friendly, patient and informative. I feel like I have a decent grasp of basic mountaineering techniques that I can practice on small, less technical peaks.

See ya this summer, Rainier!

This class is available through REI’s Outdoor School website. The cost is $125 for members and $145 for non-members.

Have you taken a class through REI before? What did you think?

Pictured above are the Outdoor Research Women’s Valhalla Pants, Outdoor Research Women’s Riot Gloves, The North Face Women’s Kira Triclimate Jacket, Black Diamond Half Dome Helmet, Icebreaker BodyFit 260 Compass Leggings – Girls’, Icebreaker BodyFit Oasis Crew Long Sleeve, Black Diamond FrontPoint Gaiters, Camelbak Aventura pack, and Triple Aught Design Artemis Hoodie.

The North Face Resolve Jacket (Big Girls)

Yes, I am small enough to shop in the kids section sometimes. Today, I have for you the North Face Resolve Jacket for Big Girls.

The North Face Resolve Jacket Review The North Face Resolve Jacket Review The North Face Resolve Jacket Review

This jacket has been my daily driver for almost an entire year now. It’s great for breezy days on the trail, light rain and moisture, protection from prickly trees and bushes, or even splashes from kayaking.

The material is North Face’s Hyvent which is slightly older technology as I think they’re on Hyvent 2L now. The jacket is fully seam taped, waterproof-y and breathable. For a 5′, 100lb~ person, the XL is roomy enough to layer a hoodie underneath for cooler days and commutes. The sleeves do run a little short though. But then again, I prefer my sleeves on the longer side of things.

It’s lightweight-ish at 12.7 oz and can pack down well into small places.

The differences between the kid version and the adult version:

  • spot to write your name in case you lose your jacket at school
  • non-adjustable hood
  • no cinch cord for the hem

The only con is there are no pit zips, but the adult version doesn’t have them either. If you’re not willing to sacrifice pit zips, you may be better off with the North Face Venture jacket, reviewed previously here.

The kids’ XL is fairly comparable to the women’s XS, except the arms and torso are just a bit wider. If you don’t mind the non-cinchable hem and the non-adjustable hood, The North Face Girls’ Resolve Jacket will set you back $65 compared to $90 for the women’s version.

The North Face Venture Jacket

The North Face Venture Jacket Review The North Face Venture Jacket Review The North Face Venture jacket is a great lightweight shell to protect from the wind and elements. Waterproof, breathable, and fully seam-taped at approximately 12 oz, it’s a good jacket to accompany you for long days on the trail.

The Venture jacket comes complete with pit zips, two hand zip pockets, Velcro wrist tabs, hem cinch cord, adjustable hood, and Velcro front closures, to help keep you safe and snug from the elements.

This runs on the roomier side to allow room for layering. An XS fits a down jacket or a thicker hoodie comfortably underneath without compromising mobility.

All in all, no complaints about this jacket. For $99, you definitely could do a lot worse. Buy through Moosejaw or Altrec.

Point Reyes: Palomarin Trailhead to Alamere Falls

Palomarin Trailhead to Alamere Falls, Point Reyes, CAHike: Palomarin trail to Alamere Falls and back
Where: Point Reyes, CA
Level: Easy
Duration: 5 hours and 3 minutes
Length: Approximately 8 miles round trip
Fitbit Steps: 24,585
Gear:
CamelBak Aventura Hydration Pack – 100 fl. oz.
,
REI Sahara Convertible Pants with No-Sit Zips
, Triple Aught Design Artemis hoodie
The North Face Resolve Rain Jacket
, & 
The North Face Hedgehog Guide GTX Hiking Shoes

This hike from the Palomarin trailhead to Alamere Falls is a moderately easy, but decently long hike. Start at the trailhead and follow signs for the falls. Early into the hike, underneath a grove of eucalyptus trees, there is a small trail to the left leading to the coast. This little offshoot leads you through green hills to a rocky beach (read: dinosaur egg rocky) that has the potential to be absolutely gorgeous in not-foggy weather.

Continue on the trail past Bass Lake until you reach a sign that points to Alamere Falls through some underbrush. If you are up for a potentially poison oak-y adventure and getting hit in the face by shrubbery, take this trail to reach the waterfall and a sandy beach. Your shell will come in handy to protect your clothing and skin from PO and snagglies.

Once you get out of the brush, begin your descent down to the first set of mini-falls of Alamere Falls. Beautiful, but small.

Palomarin Trailhead to Alamere Falls, Point Reyes, CA

Cross the stream and continue down to the top of the big falls. Look over the edge if you dare. The crumbly rock face to your right will be your way down. It’s easiest to just jump off onto the first ledge, and then run the rest of the way down onto the sandy beach Palomarin Trailhead to Alamere Falls, Point Reyes, CA. The rock is incredibly fragile and does not do well with force.

Run around and frolick in the sand, have lunch, enjoy the beach and waterfall. Then head back the way you came to get back to the trailhead.

All in all, this is a good hike if you’re out for a mellow day. It’s not strenuous and the scenery is gorgeous. The only downside is Point Reyes is a bit of a hike (ha!) if you live in the South Bay like me.

Note: This trail gets very muddy and run out when it has been raining. Proceed with caution.

Additionally, if you are not a fan of seeing people everywhere in nature, this is not the hike for you.

See this trail on Bay Area Hiker, All Trails & Every Trail.